COMMON CORE REVISITED


COMMON CORE REVISITED by Barry LevinsonBarry Levinson

Common Core certainly plays into teaching our children to the lowest common denominator. Instead of continuing to bring up those children who lag in one skill or another, the central bureaucrats decided to lower the standards for our best and brightest children.
Government workers including teachers and especially school district administrators have never been as well paid as they are today with fantastic benefits and retirement plans. One of the things they have to do to ensure those salaries and benefits remain robust is to keep quiet as to the harm Common Core is and will do to our children.
Everything is becoming centrallized like in the old Soviet Union and Communist China.
Freedom can now be partly defined as having 3 minutes to talk in front of our city council while they totally ignore the tough questions posed by the public.
Data mining of kids and their families will soon be tied into the centralized education system. Since when is wireless devices a substitute for preparing our children to become engineers, scientists and doctors.
School district’s provide assurances about the quality of Common Core which turns out to be unsupported by the facts.
But we do know one thing, the state of California Education Department received hundreds of millions of dollars to accept Common Core as the new state standard.
When government becomes more about sustaining itself and less about serving the interests of the people, we the people have a major problem on our hands. Watch the first 6 minutes of this video.

The subjugated peoples of the world did not wake up one day and decide they wanted a totalitarian government.  Usually they watched it happen over time while being in a constant state of denial.
Well the same thing is happening right now throughout the entire United States.  Are we too going to allow it to happen with hardly a whimper from the public?
Well I can only speak for myself and to that question I say heck no!
I report, you decide.
Barry Levinson

 

  1. #1 by Who bought our children's education? on June 25, 2016 - 7:58 am

    A Brief Audit of Bill Gates’ Common Core Spending
    August 27, 2013
    This is a post about Bill Gates and his money, a brief audit of his Common Core (CCSS) purchases. Before I delve into Gates accounting, allow me to set the stage with a bit of CCSS background.

    A Bit of CCSS Background

    It is important to those promoting CCSS that the public believes the idea that CCSS is “state-led.” The CCSS website reports as much and names two organizations as “coordinating” the “state-led” CCSS: The National Governors Association (NGA), and the Council for Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). Interestingly, the CCSS website makes no mention of CCSS “architect” David Coleman:

    The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). The standards were developed in collaboration with teachers, school administrators, and experts, to provide a clear and consistent framework to prepare our children for college and the workforce. [Emphasis added.]

    Nevertheless, if one reviews this 2009 NGA news release on those principally involved in CCSS development, one views a listing of 29 individuals associated with Student Achievement Partners, ACT, College Board, and Achieve. In truth, only 2 out of 29 members are not affiliated with an education company.

    CCSS as “state-led” is fiction. Though NGA reports 29 individuals as involved with CCSS creation, it looks to be even fewer:

    NGA first directly involved governors in nationalizing education standards in June 2008, when it co-hosted an education forum with the Hunt Institute, a project of former North Carolina Gov. James Hunt Jr. In December 2008, NGA, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), and Achieve Inc. released a report calling for national standards. The report recommended “a strong state-federal partnership” to accomplish this goal.

    Those three nonprofits answered their own call the next few months, deciding to commission Common Core. NGA and Hunt’s press releases during that time, and a paper describing NGA’s Common Core process by former NGA education director Dane Linn, provide no endorsement of such activity from more than a handful of elected officials. [Emphasis added.]

    Also involved in creation of CCSS is Student Achievement Partners, the company David Coleman started in 2007 in order produce national standards. Student Achievement Partners has no work other than CCSS.

    Now to Bill Gates and his money.

    Gates Buys NGA, CCSSO, Achieve, and Student Achievement Partners

    The four principal organizations associated with CCSS– NGA, CCSSO, Achieve, and Student Achievement Partners– have accepted millions from Bill Gates. In fact, prior to CCSS “completion” in June 2009, Gates had paid millions to NGA, CCSSO, and Achieve. And the millions continued to flow following CCSS completion.

    Prior to June 2009, NGA received $23.6 million from the Gates Foundation from 2002 through 2008. $19.7 million was for the highly-disruptive “high school redesign” (i.e., “small schools”) project, one that Gates abandoned.

    After June 2009, NGA received an additional $2.1 million from Gates, the largest payout coming in February 2011,

    …to work with state policymakers on the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, with special attention to effective resource reallocation to ensure complete execution, as well as rethinking state policies on teacher effectiveness
    Amount: $1,598,477 [Emphasis added.]

    Years ago, Gates paid NGA to “rethink policies on teacher effectiveness.”

    One man, lots of money, nationally shaping a profession to which he has never belonged.

    As for CCSSO: The Gates amounts are even higher than for NGA. Prior to June 2009, the Gates Foundation gave $47.1 million to CCSSO (from 2002 to 2007), with the largest amount focused on data “access” and “data driven decisions”:

    March 2007
    Purpose: to support Phase II of the National Education Data Partnership seeking to promote transparency and accessibility of education data and improve public education through data-driven decision making
    Amount: $21,642,317 [Emphasis added.]

    Following CCSS completion in June 2009, Gates funded CCSSO an additional $31.9 million, with the largest grants earmarked for CSSS implementation and assessment, and data acquisition and control:

    July 2013
    Purpose: to CCSSO, on behalf of the PARCC and SBAC consortia to support the development of high quality assessments to measure the Common Core State Standards
    Amount: $4,000,000

    November 2012
    Purpose: to support the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) in helping States’ to build their data inoperability capability and IT leadership capacity
    Amount: $1,277,648

    October 2012
    Purpose: to support strategic planning for the sustainability of the Common Core State Standards and the two multi-state assessment consortia tasked with designing assessments aligned with those standards
    Amount: $1,100,000

    June 2011
    Purpose: to support the Common Core State Standards work
    Amount: $9,388,911

    November 2009
    Purpose: to partner with federal, state, public, and private interests to develop common, open, longitudinal data standards
    Amount: $3,185,750

    July 2009
    Purpose: to increase the leadership capacity of chiefs by focusing on standards and assessments, data systems, educator development and determining a new system of supports for student learning
    Amount: $9,961,842 [Emphasis added.]

    Gates money also flowed to Achieve, Inc.; prior to June 2009, Achieve received $23.5 million in Gates funding. Another $13.2 million followed after CCSS creation, with $9.3 million devoted to “building strategic alliances” for CCSS promotion:

    June 2012
    Purpose: to strengthen and expand the ADP Network, provide
    more support to states for CCSS implementation, and build strategic national
    and statewide alliances by engaging directly with key stakeholders
    Amount: $9,297,699 [Emphasis added.]

    CCSS is not “state led.” It is “Gates led.”

    How foolish it is to believe that the man with the checkbook is not calling the CCSS shots.

    The “nonprofit” Student Achievement Partners, founded by CCSS “architect” David Coleman, also benefits handsomely via Gates. All that Student Achievement Partners does is CCSS, and for that, in June 2012, Gates granted Coleman’s company $6.5 million.

    In total, the four organizations primarily responsible for CCSS– NGA, CCSSO, Achieve, and Student Achievement Partners– have taken $147.9 million from Bill Gates.

    Common Core Gates Standards.

    Gates Buys Select Major Ed Organizations and Think Tanks

    Let us now consider major education organizations and think tanks that have accepted Gates money for the express purpose of advancing CCSS:

    American Enterprise Institute: $1,068,788.

    American Federation of Teachers: $5,400,000.

    Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: $3,269,428.

    Council of Great City Schools: $5,010,988.

    Education Trust: $2,039,526.

    National Congress of Parents and Teachers: $499,962.

    National Education Association: $3,982,597.

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute: $1,961,116.

    (For most of the organizations above, Gates has funded other reform-related efforts, including those related to charter schools, small schools, teacher evaluation, and data systems. My comprehensive listing of Gates grants for the organizations above [and then some] can be found here: Gates Foundation Grants to Select Education and Policy Groups)

    From the list of organizations above, I would like to highlight a few particular Gates purchases. First is this one, paid to the Fordham Institute:

    Date: January 2011
    Purpose: to track state progress towards implementation of standards and to understand how what students read changes in response to the standards
    Amount: $1,002,000 [Purpose emphasis added.]

    Even though CCSS was never piloted, Gates and Fordham want to watch state “progress” in implementing CCSS, and they even want to know how the untested CCSS shifts the curriculum– even though reformers are quick to parrot that CCSS is “not a curriculum.” This “tracking” tacitly acknowledges CCSS is meant to drive curriculum.

    Next is this Gates purchase of the American Enterprise Institute (AEI):

    Date: June 2012
    Purpose: to support their education policy work in four distinct areas:
    Exploring the Challenges of Common Core, Future of American Education Working Groups, Innovations in Financial Aid, and Bridging K-12 and Higher Ed with Technology
    Amount: $1,068,788 [Purpose emphasis added.]

    Gates is paying AEI to promote educational policy that bolsters CCSS. And Gates is getting his money’s worth from AEI “scholar” Frederick Hess, who offers these two articles advising “Common Core’ites.”

    Third is the Gates purchase of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT):

    Date: June 2012
    Purpose: to support the AFT Innovation Fund and work on teacher
    development and Common Core State Standards
    Amount: $4,400,000

    Even though AFT was not invited to the CCSS table until the “standards” had already been drafted by the CCSS Inner Circle noted above, and even though CCSS has not been piloted, AFT only called for a testing moratorium and not for a cease-and-desist of CCSS altogether. It appears that accepting $4.4 million in order to “work on teacher development and Common Core Standards” precludes “just saying no” to what amounts to the CCSS Colossal Education Experiment.

    Fourth is the Gates purchase of the National Education Association (NEA). In July 2013, NEA officially endorsed CCSS, and in July 2013, Gates paid NEA for its support in the form of two grants totaling $6.3 million:

    Date: July 2013
    Purpose: to support the capacity of state NEA affiliates to advance teaching and learning issues and student success in collaboration with local affiliates
    Amount: $2,426,500

    Date: July 2013
    Purpose: to support a cohort of National Education Association Master Teachers in the development of Common Core-aligned lessons in K-5 mathematics and K-12 English Language Arts
    Amount: $3,882,600

    NEA was not at the CCSS birthing table with NGA, CCSSO, Achieve, and David Coleman’s Student Achievement Partners. However, after the establishment of CCSS without teachers, now Gates is willing to pay a teachers union to create curricula that in the end do not really matter since the CCSS power is in the assessments that are completely out of NEA’s control.

    I have saved my favorite CCSS-Gates purchase for last, this one to the Council of Great City Schools (CGCS):

    Date: June 2011
    Purpose: to promote and coordinate successful implementation of the new common core standards in major urban public school systems nationwide
    Amount: $4,910,988

    Date: March 2010
    Purpose: to support the development of a cross-sector proposal to pilot test the new common core standards in a set of selected cities
    Amount: $100,000 [Purpose emphasis added.]

    It seems that Gates paid CGCS $100,000 to propose a pilot study of CCSS in 2010 (not to conduct a pilot study– just to draft the idea for a pilot). Fifteen months later, there is no mention of a “proposal” much less a pilot study materializing; instead, Gates pays CGCS to “just go ahead” and “coordinate successful implementation” of the untested CCSS.

    Enough About Bill for Now

    So much Gates cash, and so many hands willing to accept it.

    Bill Gates likes Common Core. So, he is purchasing it. In doing so, Gates demonstrates (sadly so) that when one has enough money, one can purchase fundamentally democratic institutions.

    I do not have billions to counter Gates. What I do have is this blog and the ability to expose the purchase.

    I might be without cash, but I am not without power.

    Can Bill Gates buy a foundational democratic institution? Will America allow it? The fate of CCSS will provide crucial answers to those looming questions.

    Also see Parts II, III, IV , V , and VI of this series.https://deutsch29.wordpress.com/2013/08/27/a-brief-audit-of-bill-gates-common-core-spending/

  2. #2 by "Generation of know-nothings" on July 9, 2016 - 1:11 pm

    “Our students’ ignorance is not a failing of the educational system – it is its crowning achievement.”

    Professor Patrick Deneen explains how kids have become a generation of know-nothings

    Patrick Deneen
    mindingthecampus.org
    Tue, 02 Feb 2016 16:09 UTC

    © theswcsun.com
    My students are know-nothings. They are exceedingly nice, pleasant, trustworthy, mostly honest, well-intentioned, and utterly decent. But their brains are largely empty, devoid of any substantial knowledge that might be the fruits of an education in an inheritance and a gift of a previous generation. They are the culmination of western civilization, a civilization that has forgotten nearly everything about itself, and as a result, has achieved near-perfect indifference to its own culture.

    It’s difficult to gain admissions to the schools where I’ve taught – Princeton, Georgetown, and now Notre Dame. Students at these institutions have done what has been demanded of them: they are superb test-takers, they know exactly what is needed to get an A in every class (meaning that they rarely allow themselves to become passionate and invested in any one subject); they build superb resumes. They are respectful and cordial to their elders, though easy-going if crude with their peers. They respect diversity (without having the slightest clue what diversity is) and they are experts in the arts of non-judgmentalism (at least publically). They are the cream of their generation, the masters of the universe, a generation-in-waiting to run America and the world.

    But ask them some basic questions about the civilization they will be inheriting, and be prepared for averted eyes and somewhat panicked looks. Who fought in the Peloponnesian War? Who taught Plato, and whom did Plato teach? How did Socrates die? Raise your hand if you have read both the Iliad and the Odyssey. The Canterbury Tales? Paradise Lost? The Inferno?

    Who was Saul of Tarsus? What were the 95 theses, who wrote them, and what was their effect? Why does the Magna Carta matter? How and where did Thomas Becket die? Who was Guy Fawkes, and why is there a day named after him? What did Lincoln say in his Second Inaugural? His first Inaugural? How about his third Inaugural? What are the Federalist Papers?

    Some students, due most often to serendipitous class choices or a quirky old-fashioned teacher, might know a few of these answers. But most students have not been educated to know them. At best, they possess accidental knowledge, but otherwise are masters of systematic ignorance. It is not their “fault” for pervasive ignorance of western and American history, civilization, politics, art and literature. They have learned exactly what we have asked of them – to be like mayflies, alive by happenstance in a fleeting present.

    Our students’ ignorance is not a failing of the educational system – it is its crowning achievement. Efforts by several generations of philosophers and reformers and public policy experts — whom our students (and most of us) know nothing about — have combined to produce a generation of know-nothings. The pervasive ignorance of our students is not a mere accident or unfortunate but correctible outcome, if only we hire better teachers or tweak the reading lists in high school. It is the consequence of a civilizational commitment to civilizational suicide. The end of history for our students signals the End of History for the West.

    During my lifetime, lamentation over student ignorance has been sounded by the likes of E.D. Hirsch, Allan Bloom, Mark Bauerlein and Jay Leno, among many others. But these lamentations have been leavened with the hope that appeal to our and their better angels might reverse the trend (that’s an allusion to Lincoln’s first inaugural address, by the way). E.D. Hirsch even worked up a self-help curriculum, a do-it yourself guide on how to become culturally literate, imbued with the can-do American spirit that cultural defenestration could be reversed by a good reading list in the appendix. Broadly missing is sufficient appreciation that this ignorance is the intended consequence of our educational system, a sign of its robust health and success.

    We have fallen into the bad and unquestioned habit of thinking that our educational system is broken, but it is working on all cylinders. What our educational system aims to produce is cultural amnesia, a wholesale lack of curiosity, history-less free agents, and educational goals composed of content-free processes and unexamined buzz-words like “critical thinking,” “diversity,” “ways of knowing,” “social justice,” and “cultural competence.”

    Our students are the achievement of a systemic commitment to producing individuals without a past for whom the future is a foreign country, cultureless ciphers who can live anywhere and perform any kind of work without inquiring about its purposes or ends, perfected tools for an economic system that prizes “flexibility” (geographic, interpersonal, ethical).

    In such a world, possessing a culture, a history, an inheritance, a commitment to a place and particular people, specific forms of gratitude and indebtedness (rather than a generalized and deracinated commitment to “social justice”), a strong set of ethical and moral norms that assert definite limits to what one ought and ought not to do (aside from being “judgmental”) are hindrances and handicaps.

    Regardless of major or course of study, the main object of modern education is to sand off remnants of any cultural or historical specificity and identity that might still stick to our students, to make them perfect company men and women for a modern polity and economy that penalizes deep commitments. Efforts first to foster appreciation for “multi-culturalism” signaled a dedication to eviscerate any particular cultural inheritance, while the current fad of “diversity” signals thoroughgoing commitment to de-cultured and relentless homogenization.

    We Must Know…What?

    Above all, the one overarching lesson that students receive is the true end of education: the only essential knowledge is that know ourselves to be radically autonomous selves within a comprehensive global system with a common commitment to mutual indifference. Our commitment to mutual indifference is what binds us together as a global people. Any remnant of a common culture would interfere with this prime directive: a common culture would imply that we share something thicker, an inheritance that we did not create, and a set of commitments that imply limits and particular devotions.

    Ancient philosophy and practice praised as an excellent form of government a res publica – a devotion to public things, things we share together. We have instead created the world’s first Res Idiotica – from the Greek word idiotes, meaning “private individual.” Our education system produces solipsistic, self-contained selves whose only public commitment is an absence of commitment to a public, a common culture, a shared history. They are perfectly hollowed vessels, receptive and obedient, without any real obligations or devotions.

    They won’t fight against anyone, because that’s not seemly, but they won’t fight for anyone or anything either. They are living in a perpetual Truman Show, a world constructed yesterday that is nothing more than a set for their solipsism, without any history or trajectory.

    I love my students – like any human being, each has enormous potential and great gifts to bestow upon the world. But I weep for them, for what is rightfully theirs but hasn’t been given. On our best days, I discern their longing and anguish and I know that their innate human desire to know who they are, where they have come from, where they ought to go, and how they ought to live will always reassert itself. But even on those better days, I can’t help but hold the hopeful thought that the world they have inherited – a world without inheritance, without past, future, or deepest cares – is about to come tumbling down, and that this collapse would be the true beginning of a real education.

    About the author

    Patrick Deneen is David A. Potenziani Memorial Associate Professor of Constitutional Studies at Notre Dame.

    https://www.sott.net/article/312948-Professor-Patrick-Deneen-explains-how-kids-have-become-a-generation-of-know-nothings

(will not be published)


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